1-800-the-Voice.com 1-800-the-Voice.com Voiceover Recording Studio and Instruction Course
Home Page Mike Knott The Voiceover Jukebox Voiceover FAQ's Voice Packages Order Form Links Email
FAQ's - A Career in Voiceover
What is Voiceover?
Do I have to be an actor to do Voiceovers?
How long does it take to learn?
Do I need a great voice?
Who should do Voiceover?
How much money can I make?
What if I don't live in New York or Hollywood?
Will I just be doing commercials?
Where do I go from here?
The Voice Package
Easy to use home study course
Q:   What is Voiceover?
A:   Often called the "Theater of the Mind", Voiceover is acting with your voice, really "working" the words and phrases. When you hear commercials on the radio or on TV... listen to the narrator of a cartoon story or film documentary... learn routine information while "on hold"... play CD games... or use high-tech toys... you are listening to Voiceover. It's just about everywhere, from "in yo face" to "in the background". And the folks that read and record the written scripts are called Voiceover Artists.

back to top

Q:   Do I have to be an actor to do Voiceovers?
A:   Surprisingly, many people in the business have never been on a stage or in front of a camera. As voice talent, your job is to use your voice and your imagination to breathe life into the client's script. In today's world of real people casting, you may actually be a dentist, a mechanic, a waitress, a student, a young kid or senior citizen. And yes, a theatrical background is still a valuable asset, though not required.

back to top

Q:   How long does it take to learn?
A:   That depends on how long have you been working on your voice so far. Have you ever been a singer or dramatic actor? Those with previous training and experience can be ready to go into the studio and make their demo within a week. Newcomers should spend a little more time. The more time you spend with my home study course "The Voice Package", reading from the scripts, listening to the tapes, and practicing what you learn, the sooner you'll be ready to record a demo tape that will get you noticed and really get you jobs.

back to top

Q:   Do I need a great voice?
A:   Relax, be yourself. There is no one voice. Agencies may be looking for a woman who can do a child's voice or a man with a deep voice like James Earl Jones. Often they don't know exactly what they want until they hear it. People who have a wide range of styles do well. It all comes down to being consistent and creative. Agents are always looking for new voices that have a certain attitude or style that gets the listener's attention.

back to top

Q:   Who should do Voiceover?
A:   If people often say you have a good voice...they're probably right. You should be someone who is comfortable meeting and working with new people. Your phone and answering machine are very important. When you enter the world of Voiceover, you'll be making phone calls, sending out tapes, photos and resumes, and going out on auditions and to recording sessions. And as long as you can draw a breath, you can draw a paycheck.

back to top

Q:   How much money can I make?
A:   Some big name celebrities earn as much as $1 million or more for just one campaign. But until then...most lesser known voiceover artists earn between $50,000 and $80,000 a year, many with six-figure incomes. Individually most local radio and TV spots pay about $300 to $600 each for :30 sec. and :60 sec. copy. Corporate or Industrial narrations pay $500 and up. Regional and national spots pay from $2,000 to $10,000 and up. The goal is to score on a regular basis and produce a comfortable income stream from the residuals paid to you each time a commercial or program airs another 13 weeks. And if you treat your clients and associates like the gold they really are, you will get much of your business from repeats and referrals

back to top

Q:   What if I don't live in New York or Hollywood?
A:   As long as there is a recording studio in your area, you'll be fine. These days it doesn't really matter where you live. It's nice if you're fairly close to a radio or television station. You may want to start your career in Radio as a DJ or on Television as a Station Announcer. As a freelance Voice-Over Artist, you often record in a nearby studio for clients that are not even located in your area. They will typically fax or email you the script and direct you via a "phone patch" into the studio. Then, when you're done, you can overnight mail the tape or CD. In many cases you can even ftp the finished audio files or email them as attachments.

back to top

Q:   Will I just be doing commercials?
A:   While commercials usually make the most money, you won't necessarily make most of your money doing just commercials. There are lots of great paying jobs doing corporate narration, documentary, news, straight and character voices for cartoons, books on tape, On-Hold messages, musical jingles, CDs and the rapidly expanding interactive entertainment industry. Female, Youth, and Ethnic markets are opening up fast. In fact, there's more work now than ever before.

back to top

Q:   Where do I go from here?
A:   Be sure to prepare yourself for this new business you are entering. You need to create an impressive demo tape that properly showcases your talent to those who are in the position to hire you. To be sure you're giving it your best shot, check out my home study course... "The Voice Package" ...It may be just what you're looking for.

back to top


Home Mike Knott Jukebox FAQ's Voice Package Order Form Links E-mail
All Rights Reserved 2003 Michael Knott
www.1-800-the-voice.com